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 |  by Krista

How do you teach your kids forgiveness?

There’s a rule in our house that if anyone being tickled says, “Stop,” the tickler must quit immediately. (Grandpa has had to be completely re-trained in this matter!) We have labelled it an essential form of respect, and we abide by it unfailingly. Both our kids are very ticklish. But while Jessica delights in that kind of physical contact, Benjamin avoids it at all costs.

Related Lesson: Forgiveness
 |  by Krista

Crosses of forgiveness

I had a tough choice to make the other day. I could clean the interior of my car (hadn’t had a vacuum and wipe-down all winter) or I could read over the Kids of Integrity Forgiveness lesson so we could start it after school. Hmmm. I thought about using the car as a greenhouse – just seed directly into the dust layer on the dash and park in the sun. We could get a nice head start on our tomatoes!

Related Lesson: Forgiveness
 |  by Krista

Spring distractions

Spring weather typically puts a bounce in my step and seems to make life purr. Everything is lighter . . . easier. Goodbye, bulky winter wear, hello windbreakers and rubber boots! Mr. Sun’s newfound warmth is banishing the cold, the dark and the snow. And, yes, the puddles have made their annual transformation into kid magnets.

Related Lesson: Forgiveness
 |  by Krista

Mouldy attitudes and grace from a seven year old

Don’t ask me how we managed to do it, but we were UNABLE to grow any mould on our bread! Seriously, are there any scientist-type people out there who can explain that? We kept it warm. We made sure it was moist. Then we thought it might be too warm, so we moved it to a few different areas in the house. I’m loath to admit it, but that crazy piece of rye was pampered for 15 days! Finally Rob got really tired of finding an uncooperative slice of bread in unusual places, and he chucked it. So much for a visually memorable object lesson.

Related Lesson: Respect
 |  by Krista

Rainbow girls and stuffie-loving boys

There she stood in the doorway of her bedroom, in all her four-year-old glory. Her tights had wide, horizontal, rainbow-coloured stripes. Her skirt (pushed down below her kindergarten belly . . . the way she likes to wear bottoms) had narrow vertical bands of colour in ten different hues. Her t-shirt was hot pink, and though her hoodie tried to match, really, it was a different shade of rose. “Look, Mommy! I’m a rainbow girl. I’m so bright nobody could lose me today!”  Whew! That’s for sure.

Related Lesson: Respect
 |  by Krista

Respect is growing, mould is not

Squeals of delight rang through the house. “This is like a treasure hunt!” crowed Jessica. “I can’t find any!” cried Benjamin. Both kids raced from room to room, searching behind doors and under furniture. No, we were not having an early Easter egg hunt. The kids were looking for dust to put on a slice of bread for the Respect object lesson “Mouldy Attitudes.” Rob chuckled, “Yeah. Put that in the blog – that the kids can’t find any dust in our house.” Ha!

Related Lesson: Respect
 |  by Krista

Our rainbow of respect

We started on the Respect lesson with a bang last week! One of the object lessons involves becoming “Respect Detectives.” The original suggestion has the kids looking for disrespectful actions. We added a positive spin and made a chart for both the good and the bad. Rob and I talked about respect having a broad span and suggested that it applies to God, ourselves, other people and the rest of creation. That gave us lots to “detect.”

Related Lesson: Respect
 |  by Krista

Reviewing character throughout Christmas

This post should have been written three weeks ago (you know an excuse is coming, don’t you?). Well, our family’s “birthday season” begins right after the Christmas season – two are in the first week of January. We go straight from garlands to birthday balloons. Can you say, “Hectic”? With that in mind, I’m begging forgiveness and pretending it’s just the start of the month!

 |  by Krista

Our fun and fresh acceptance tree

Two posts ago ("Acceptance blues"), I lamented the static nature of the family tree suggestion for the Kick-off craft activity. At the time, I expected to breeze through this lesson because there wasn’t a project my kids wanted to sink their teeth into, and my brain was void of creative ideas. Jessica was especially disappointed; so, one morning, we sat down and prayed that God would send a new, exciting idea to help this lesson come alive.

Related Lesson: Acceptance
 |  by Krista

Food on trial: acceptance v. squash

Question: What do squash, green pancake batter, and Asian and Polish food have in common?
Answer: An initial “Yuck!” response from my kids.

Related Lesson: Acceptance

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